Home | CV | Contact
  • Assistant Professor of Aesthetic Studies at The University of Texas at Dallas 
  • Expertise in Post-WWII Art, Architecture and Urbanism and Media Theory
  • Freelance Curator and Critic
  • Ph.D. Harvard University, Architectural History and Theory, 2004
  • M.A. Harvard University, Architectural History and Theory, 2001
  • M.A. University of Illinois at Chicago, Art History, 1996
  • B.A. University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Art History, 1992

Charissa N. Terranova is Assistant Professor of Aesthetic Studies at The University of Texas at Dallas. She lectures and teaches seminars on art and architectural history, theory, and criticism and media and new media theory. She is a scholarly writer and freelance curator and critic working both nationally and internationally. In January 2010, she stepped down from the position of Founding Director and Chief Curator of Centraltrak: The UT Dallas Artists Residency in order to complete her scholarly manuscript.

Dr. Terranova is currently writing a book-length prehistory of the digital image in art building on themes of technological mediation, theories of embodiment, and the history of dematerialization/virtualization in art present in her first book [Automotive Prosthetic: Technological Mediation and the Car in Conceptual Art]. It is an archival project tracing a spatial, mobile, and experiential, or “haptic,” sense of the image, materializing by way of systems theory, Gestalt psychology in the arts, and extant and emerging technologies. The book focuses on kinetic, light, op, early computer and new media, and conceptual art evolving between 1937 and 1970, from the early years of the New Bauhaus in Chicago to the creation of the Center for Advanced Visual Studies at MIT in 1967.  The following themes are central to this study: the pedagogy of Laszlo Moholy-Nagy at the Institute of Design, or New Bauhaus, in Chicago, art and writings of Hungarian artist and educator György Kepes, in particular the Vision and Values series of 1965-66, Rudolf Arnheim’s Gestalt-based idea of vision and approach to the art object, Norbert Wiener’s systems-based cybernetics, Kevin Lynch’s automotive “image of the city,” the art historical and curatorial propositions of Jack Burnham in the late 1960s, and the evolution from kinetic and op art to early computer, new media art, and conceptualism.

Dr. Terranova’s book, Automotive Prosthetic: Technological Mediation and the Car in Conceptual Art, focuses on conceptual art, the aesthetic experience of seeing the world in motion through the car window, and the global political economy of the automobile and petroleum products in the post-WWII period.

Copyright © Charissa N. Terranova. All rights reserved.